Power Up! How to get it. How communities can use it.

Communities in Control 2010

Power Up! How to get it. How communities can use it.

Conference opened 31 May 2010, Melbourne
You need to change the world, or your bit of the world, because it's just not working right the way it is. That's why community groups exist.

The world isn't going to change itself. You're going to need the tools and the commitment and the leverage to force it open.

And the power.

The world is going to resist being changed. That's just the way things are. If you want things to move, you're going to need to push. Or pull.

You can't be given power (if it has to be given to you it kind of defeats the point). You have to take it. Community groups of every size and scope at every level need to learn how to seek power, and grasp it, and wield it to bring about their goals. You need to understand how the machinations work, so you can ensure your members, stakeholders, clients - anyone who has been excluded, or could be excluded - can get their fair share too.

At Communities in Control 2010 we looked at issues of power - who has it; who needs it; how to get it; and how to use it to create change for equality, inclusion and justice.



> Download 2010 conference brochure (PDF)

Added 01 June 2010

Brett de Hoedt, Hugh de Kretser, Paul Bird, Cr Stephen Mayne

The Great Debate: Are Communities Out Of Control?

If you believe the shock jocks, our communities are spiralling out of control with increased crime, race attacks, knife fights and other dysfunction. But is this the reality?

Added 01 June 2010

Dr Anne Summers AO

Shifting Power: We changed the world, now what's different?

In the 1970s, Anne Summers was at the vanguard of the movement that changed Australia for women. Three decades on, debate still rages about equal pay, female representation on boards and in other senior roles remains pitifully low, and female-dominated professions remain largely under-valued and underpaid.

Added 01 June 2010

Christine Nixon

The 2010 Community Leadership Oration

Christine Nixon knows all about trailblazing. The first woman to become a police commissioner in Australia, she's fought corruption, she's been applauded and criticised for marching in uniform at a gay and lesbian 'pride march' in support of human rights, she's witnessed the heartbreak of those who lost life, property and hope in the bushfires, she's seen a lot more of the grimier side of life than most. Yet she's never lost her belief in compassion and humour and the strength of the human spirit.

Added 01 June 2010
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Emer. Prof. Richard Wilkinson, Prof. Kate Pickett

The Levelling Spirit: Why more equal societies almost always do better

Revealing the results of hard-hitting study and new book on the social effects of inequality and the profound implications for communities.

Added 31 May 2010

Mary OHagan

First Person: The role of lived experience in shaping mental health services

With the selection of youth mental health expert Professor Patrick McGorry as the 2010 Australian Citizen of the Year, the issue of mental health has never been more prominent. Internationally renowned mental health consumer advocate Mary O'Hagan wades in to help ensure we don't forget those who matter most as new services emerge - the users.